Liverpool FC will wear its colours proudly next week to take part in this year’s virtual Pride in Liverpool march, ‘MarchOnline’, in support of the LGBT+ community.

Pride in Liverpool, which is delivered by LCR Pride Foundation, is hosting its first virtual celebrations due to its traditional festival being cancelled as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. 

‘Young at Heart’ is the 2020-21 theme and aims to highlight the benefits of self-care, being active and doing the things you love as well as your physical and mental wellbeing. It also strives to provide a platform to celebrate LGBT+ individuals working in the sport, health and wellbeing sectors and shine a spotlight on organisations and services working hard to facilitate good physical and mental health in the region’s LGBT+ community.

Instead of marching through the city’s streets, LFC staff will join the LCR Pride Foundation’s ‘MarchOnline’ to come together safely with the LGBT+ community to virtually march in solidarity, celebration and in protest against the prejudice and inequalities that the LGBT+ community continues to face in the UK and across the globe.

The virtual march, which will be broadcast from the LCR Pride Foundation’s social channels at 12pm BST on Saturday July 25, will comprise videos of people marching, cheering and holding placards in their own homes, submitted by the members of the public, charities and businesses supporting the LGBT+ community.

LFC was proudly the first Premier League football club to take part in a Pride march back in 2012. It was also the first Premier League club to hold the Premier League Equality Standard Advanced Level, an accolade well received by Reds fans around the world. 

Alongside this year’s virtual march, there will be an interview with Paul Amann from Kop Outs - LFC’s LGBT+ fan group - in the matchday programme for next Wednesday’s game against Chelsea at Anfield and on Liverpoolfc.com. Meanwhile, Anfield’s Sir Kenny Dalglish Stand will feature a rainbow flag for the meeting with Chelsea.

The club’s iconic crest will also be displayed in full rainbow colours across its global social media platforms from Monday July 20 in support of the Pride in Liverpool celebrations. 

A signed Virgil van Dijk shirt from this season will also be auctioned on Football Aid, with all proceeds donated to The Michael Causer Foundation - a charity which supports Liverpool’s vulnerable lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender young people by providing safe accommodation for those who are homeless or at risk.

Bidding on the shirt is available now here. The auction will close at midnight BST on July 31.

LFC Foundation, the club’s official charity, will be running a variety of Pride activities, including linking up with Football v Homophobia’s Football Pride to support their virtual sports sessions as well as providing their own LGBT-themed virtual sessions throughout next week.

Peter Moore, Liverpool FC’s CEO, said: “I am delighted that our staff and fans are able to come together and take part in the Pride in Liverpool virtual march.

“The promotion of equality, diversity and inclusion with our staff, players and supporters is of the utmost importance to us and we are committed to incorporating it into everything we do. 

“We will be proudly wearing our colours next month to continue our support of Pride in Liverpool and stand side by side, albeit virtually, in solidarity with the LGBT+ community.”

LCR Pride Foundation interim CEO, Andi Herring, said: “It has never been more important for us to find a way to come together as a community, feel connected and march with Pride. ‘MarchOnline’ provides us with a safe way to do that from our homes and mark what would have been the weekend of Pride in Liverpool.

“We’re looking forward to seeing the diversity and creativity of the Liverpool City Region’s LGBT+ community, its supporters and allies shining through in our virtual march. Even despite a global pandemic, we will march on!” 

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